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What's Fresh Right Now?

Beans—green/purple long

Corn—silver queen

Cucumbers—slicers, kirby

Eggplant—fairytale, graffiti, purple italian, asian

Fennel

Garlic—chives

Greens—rutabaga

Herbs—parsley, dill, cilantro, curry leaf, italian/lemon/thai basil, mint, thyme

Honey—orange blossom, gallberry, wildflower, tupelo

Moringa

Mushrooms—shiitake, white/blue/yellow oyster, lion's mane, trumpet, dried shiitake

Okra

Onions—green, red/yellow

Papaya—green, ripe

Peaches

Peanuts—green, boiled

Peas—shelled and unshelled, white acre, pink eye, black eye, creamer

Peppers—green/red/purple bell, shishito, jalapeno, cherry bomb, serrano, poblano, anaheim, banana

Potatoes—red/white

Radishes—globe

Rutabaga

Shoots and Sprouts

Squash—long/italian/golden zucchini, yellow crookneck, summer, white/yellow pattypan, kobacha, acorn, hubbard, spaghetti, butternut, calabaza, seminole pumpkin

Tomatoes—cluster, heirloom, grape, sun gold, plum

Turmeric

Local and Fresh—
Peanuts


       Peanuts are so versatile. They are found in recipes and kitchens around the world. We grow our share in North Central Florida, although we donít erect statues to the famous legume like they do in South Georgia.
       Raw or green peanuts are often boiled in salted water with or without spices. Since they grow underground, be sure to wash them well before cooking. Do not store for more than a day or two after purchase. Once dried, peanuts store well, but take longer to cook. Use dried raw peanuts, boiled without their shell, as you would beans.
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Time to put food by!

Look around for seasonal foods you want to eat year-round.

I oven-dry tomatoes, pack them in olive oil and store the jars in the
fridge until I need some summer flavor deep in the winter.

Pickling is a great way to put up not only cucumbers, but beans, peppers
and okra. Follow USDA guidelines for safe canning.

Freezing food is easy and popular. I love to throw a bag or two of
creamer peas in the freezer to serve on my holiday table.
I freeze sliced mangoes and peaches every year—my trick is a little
drizzle of maple syrup to keep the slices from sticking together.

Don’t freeze too much though—we have to consider power outages
due to hurricanes as we put food by.