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Beans—green, yellow, purple, green/purple long

Beets

Bitter Melon

Bok Choy

Chestnuts

Cucumbers—slicers, mini, kirby

Eggplant—purple italian, purple japanese, fairy tale
baby

Greens—mustards, sweet potato, mizuna, arugula, chard, turnip

Herbs—garlic chives, thai basil, turmeric

Honey

Kale—dino, curly, tuscan

Lettuce—red/green romaine, leaf

Moringa

Mushrooms—fresh/dried shiitakes

Okra—green

Onions—yellow, green

Pears—Florida sand

Peas—white acre

Peppers—red/green/yellow/orange/mini sweet bell, poblano, cayenne, banana, jalepeño, italian roasting, variety hot

Persimmon

Potatoes—sweet, fingerling

Raddish—red, daikon, watermelon, easter egg

Roselle

Shoots, Sprouts and Microgreens

Squash—butternut, seminole pumpkin, calabaza, green/yellow zucchini, pattypan

Tomatoes—grape, beefsteak, cherry, large plum, sun gold

Turnips

Local and Fresh—
Sweet Potatoes


        Sweet potatoes are grown throughout the South and we have a few varieties grown by local farmers, including both purple and white.         The first issue of Hogtown HomeGrown featured sweet potatoes in three recipes. Ten years later, the recipe below represents how I cook now—simple ingredients, easy cooking methods and fewer sugars, often tending toward vegan versions of things.
        Look for firm sweet potatoes without soft spots or cuts from harvesting. Store in a cool spot and remove any sprouts before cooking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More bakers are selling their wares at our local markets,
with everything from pretzels to croissants to muffins.
Baguettes and loaves include sourdough, rye, whole wheat,
white, spelt, plus specialty flour blends and flavors.
Some bakers use organic ingredients and natural yeasts—just ask!
There are also vendors with gluten-free baked goods
for those with gluten sensitivities.