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Beans—purple/ green long

Citrus—juices

Cucumbers—mini seedless, slicers

Eggplant—italian small/large, asian

Garlic—chives, elephant

Ginger

Greens—collards, malabar spinach, mustards, arugula

Herbs—italian/opal basil, lemongrass, mint, allspice/curry/lime/bay/cinnamon leaf

Honey

Okra—green

Onions—white, sweet

Papaya—green, ripe

Peas—white acre

Peppers—red/green sweet bell, cubanelle, poblano, jalepeno

Persimmon—astrigent/non-astringent

Pineapple

Potatoes—small red/white

Shoots, Sprouts and Microgreens

Squash—yellow crookneck, zucchini, acorn, butternut, kabocha, pumpkin, calabaza

Starfruit

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes—grape, plum, beefsteak, green

 

Local and Fresh—
Ginger


        Recently at the Haile Farmers Market, I
saw fresh ginger roots with green stems. They
were about the size of a large finger and several
of them were nestled in a basket on Possum
Hollow’s table. The skin was fresh and tender
unlike the dried brown paper-like covering on
grocery store ginger.

        Ginger is not only tasty in foods from
stir-fries to baked goods, it is good for your
body, with applications ranging from skin-care
to intestinal health.

        Ginger comes in a few different forms,
including the large “hands” of fresh ginger root,
dried and ground into powder to be used for
cooking or to be put in capsules to take internally, and, my favorite, crystallized ginger.

        Fresh ginger root should be plump and
healthy-looking, with no mold where pieces
have been cut or broken. Use the back of a
knife or the side of a spoon to easily remove the
peel before grating or chopping. Store ginger in
the refrigerator or freezer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PUTTING FOOD BY: PERSIMMONS
Persimmon pulp can be stored in the freezer to add moisture and flavor to baked goods all year-round.
Squeeze ripe persimmons and puree in either a food processor or blender
before placing 1 cup portions in freezer bags or containers.
Try using it in place of some of the fat in your favorite vegan or low-fat recipes.
Replace the bananas with persimmons in your favorite banana bread recipe
for a fresh and flavorful change of pace.