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Beans—purple/ green long

Citrus—juices

Cucumbers—mini seedless, slicers

Eggplant

Fig

Garlic—chives

Greens—collards, malabar spinach, mustards, moringa

Herbs—italian/opal basil, lemongrass, dill, cilantro, mint

Honey

Muscadines

Okra—green

Onions—green, yellow, red, heritage

Peanuts—green in-shell

Pears

Peas—crowder, white acre, creamer, pink eye

Peppers—red/green/yellow/orange sweet bell, cubanelle, poblano, jalepeno, shinshito

Pineapple

Potatoes—small red/white

Shoots, Sprouts and Microgreens

Squash—yellow crookneck, zucchini, acorn, butternut, kabocha, pumpkin

Tomatoes—grape, plum, beefsteak

 

Local and Fresh—
Pineapple


        Look closely at the farmers market
these days and you’ll see pineapples! I judge
ripeness by pulling out a leaf or smelling the
bottom, but ask for help choosing one if you
don’t know how.

        Yes, it has thick skin, but it can be
peeled easily—see Tricks and Tips on page 4.
One fruit will feed 2-8 people, depending on
its size, so the cost per serving is reasonable.

        These members of the bromeliad
family can be grown from the top of the fruit.
Cut one inch of the flesh with the crown of
leaves, plant it in well-drained pot of soil,
water it, leave it outside and let it grow.

        And then go get another pineapple
from the farmers market, since it will be years
before your plant yields fruit!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hogtown HomeGrown Public Demo Schedule

In Celebration of World Food Day
Wednesday, October 22, 5:30 p.m. at Union Street Farmers Market