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Beets—red, striped, golden, pink

Bok Choy

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage—green, napa, savoy, red

Carrots—orange, red, yellow, purple

Cauliflower—white, romanescu

Citrus—orange, grapefruit, lemon, calamondin

Fennel

Greens—escarole, chard, kale, mustard, arugula, wild arugula, mizuna, collards, sorrel, moringa, spinach

Greens with roots —turnips, rutabaga, beets, carrots, radish

Herbs—dill, cilantro, flat/curly parsley, lime leaf, thyme, mint, garlic chives

Honey

Leeks and Gar-leeks

Lettuce—red/green leaf, romaine, buttercrunch, spring mix

Mushrooms—shiitake

Onions—red/white scallions, spring

Peas—snow, sugar snap, english

Peppers—red/green/yellow/orange sweet bell, variety hot

Pineapple

Potatoes—sweet, white russet

Radish—daikon, globe, easter egg, red/white icicle

Shoots, Sprouts and Microgreens

Strawberries

Tomatoes—grape, beefsteak, heirloom, cherry, green

Turnips

Tumeric

Local and Fresh—
Pineapple


        Most of us think of Hawaiian pineapples, but in the late 1800s, pineapples were a big crop in Florida. It lasted until around 1910 when a disease called “red wilt” destroyed not only the pineapple plants in the field, but finished off the industry as well.
        We are so lucky that wonderful juicy sweet pineapples are grown in North Central Florida. Available in several sizes, ask the farmer to help you select one for ripeness if you want to eat it right away.
        Look for intact skin, healthy-looking leaves and a fresh smell. Judge ripeness by the smell and color of the bottom, plus the traditional test of pulling out a leaf from the crown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016 Eat Local Challenge Kickoff and Local Food Fair
Sunday May 1, 2016 1:00pm – 4:00pm
Matheson History Museum, 513 East University Avenue


Enjoy a fun afternoon outdoors
with farmers, foodies and entrepreneurs
to celebrate the local food movement and
the 9th annual Eat Local Challenge.

How can you participate in the Challenge? Eat locally grown and produced food
either at home or in locally-owned restaurants every day for the entire month of May.


FREE TO EVERYONE—Vendors and Visitors—NO CHARGE FOR ANYONE!