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Beans—purple/green long, green

Beets—red

Berries—blueberries, blackberries

BokChoy

Cabbage—napa

Carrots—orange, yellow

Corn—triple-sweet

Cucumbers—pickling, slicers

Eggplant—white/purple/heirloom italian, white/purple/green japanese, fairy tale baby

Fennel

Garlic—heads, elephant

Greens—chard, kale, lemon sorrel, arugula

Herbs—mint, garlic chives, sage, oregano, rosemary, italian/purple/lemon/thai/tulsi basil, parsley

Kohlrabi—green, purple

Leeks

Lettuce—red/green butterhead, romaine

Melons—cantaloupe, watermelon, crenshaw, sun jewel, sugar cube

Moringa

Okra

Onions—white/red, sweet

Peaches

Peas—pink/black eye, white acre, zipper, creamer

Peppers—red/green/yellow/orange/mini sweet bell, poblano, cayenne, chile, banana, jalepeno, variety hot

Pineapple

Potatoes—white, red new, fingerling, purple, sweet

Shoots, Sprouts and Microgreens

Squash—pattypan, acorn, butternut, kabocha, buttercup, pumpkin, seminole pumpkin

Tomatoes—grape, beefsteak, heirloom, cherry, large/small plum, green

 

 

 

 

Local and Fresh—
Thyme


        A relative of oregano, thyme may be used fresh or dried—a teaspoon of dried equals three teaspoons of fresh.
        Fresh thyme stems may be added to soups and stews and removed before serving. Leaves may be stripped from stems easily by running fingers from bottom to top of stem. Chopped leaves release more oils and increase a dish’s flavor, but leaves may be used whole for more subtlety.
        Wrap fresh thyme in a paper towel and store refrigerated in a plastic bag.